status

8 Facts to Fight Fleas and Ticks

Spring might kick off flea and tick season, but prevention requires year-round effort. “Fleas reproduce at such a fast rate that things can get out of control very quickly,” says Daniel Snyder, DVM, of Indianapolis, secretary-treasurer of the American Association of Veterinary Parasitologists. “Ticks, particularly, can spread disease to both dogs and humans, so it’s important to get rid of them quickly.”

For more information, click here…

Common Flea

 

Male Tick

29
Mar 2012
POSTED IN

Fleas & Ticks

DISCUSSION No Comments
status

Indian Meal Moths

Have you ever found creepy crawlies in your pantry? More than likely, they are Indian Meal Moths. They feed on dried fruits, grains, seeds, nuts, chocolate, candies, bird seed, dog food, powdered milk, dried red peppers and candy. Indian Meal Moths are attracted to the light, these bugs are found worldwide in areas where food is stored, such as grocery stores and even your pantry. They infest foods and can contaminate food products. Dried food products should be inspected thoroughly for signs of moth infestations. Discard infested foods in outdoor trash bins. Clean infested cupboards thoroughly with a vacuum and soap and water. Store food in sealed containers.

26
Mar 2012
POSTED IN

News

DISCUSSION No Comments
status

We Even Take Care of Snakes!

26
Mar 2012
POSTED IN

Photo Gallery

DISCUSSION No Comments
status

Termites

Preview

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

26
Mar 2012
POSTED IN

Photo Gallery, Termites

DISCUSSION No Comments
status

Wildlife Trapping

              Possum

             Raccoon

Raccoon

26
Mar 2012
POSTED IN

Photo Gallery

DISCUSSION No Comments
status

Carpenter Bees

by Mike Potter, Extension Entomologist

University of Kentucky College of Agriculture

 

carpenter beeIn the late-spring and early summer, homeowners often notice large, black bees hovering around the outside of their homes. These are probably carpenter bees searching for mates and favorable sites to construct their nests. Male carpenter bees are quite aggressive, often hovering in front of people who are around the nests. The males are quite harmless, however, since they lack stingers. Female carpenter bees can inflict a painful sting but seldom will unless they are handled or molested.

 

Carpenter bees resemble bumble bees, but the upper surface of their abdomen is bare and shiny black; bumble bees have a hairy abdomen with at least some yellow markings.

More on Carpenter Bees…

22
Mar 2012
POSTED IN

News

DISCUSSION No Comments
status

Mosquitoes

One of the best known summer pests, mosquitoes breed in stagnant water or soft soil and can develop from egg to adult in 10 to 14 days.
Only the female mosquitoes suck our blood. Male mosquitoes feed on plant nectar. They are most active from dusk to dawn and will fly up to 14 miles for a blood meal. Mosquitoes breed in stagnant water sources such as storm drains, old tires, children’s wading pools and birdbaths.

Mosquitoes are well-known to spread diseases such as West Nile Virus, malaria and dengue fever. Over 300 million cases of malaria are reported  resulting in 100 million deaths vs. 300,000 to 600,000 cases of West Nile Virus.

19
Mar 2012
POSTED IN

Mosquitoes

DISCUSSION No Comments
status

Angie’s List

Find Guardian Pest Solutions on Angie’s List!

Are you a member? Please go to Angie’s List and post your comments/reviews. Thanks!

19
Mar 2012
POSTED IN

Termites

DISCUSSION No Comments
status

Ants: The Spring House Guest No One Wants, But Nearly Everyone Gets

Springtime is ant time as ants march into homes in search of food. With more than 700 species of ants in the U.S. and about two dozen classified as pests, many homeowners will likely encounter these unwelcome visitors.

“Ants are more than a nuisance. They can contaminate food, bite when threatened and damage our property,” noted Missy Henriksen, vice president of public affairs for the National Pest Management Association. “However, which species of ant invades can depend on geography.”

Here are some species homeowners should lookout for this spring:

Read More….

19
Mar 2012
POSTED IN

Ants, News

DISCUSSION No Comments